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Social Entrepreneurship is on the rise and not before time. Social entrepreneurs like Muhammad Yunus, Ela Bhatt and in recent times Jamie Oliver are being recognised for the work they are doing by highlighting and offering solutions to social problems using  entrepreneurial business principles to develop, create, systemise, manage and ultimately lead social change through social ventures.

We know in business the typical expectation has been to measure work performance and productivity in return of profit whereas a social entrepreneur  creates value by creating social capital.

Social Entrepreneurship can work well because it focuses on growing social and environmental goals and  it is normally based on “creating and innovating.” What it’s not about is supporting a culture of handouts or “victim” based conditioning  prevalent in many spheres of current society.

The rewards of Social Entrepreneurship are founded on effort and reward,as the natural human motivation  is to succeed where previously the motivation may not exist.

Social Entrepreneurship historically has been associated with the non-for-profit and volunteer sector however this is changing as business is also getting involved by partnering with non-for-profits as they recognise the social benefits and their CSR (Community Social Responsibility) obligations.

Social Entrepreneurs contribute in a matter that adds real value to communities that may not previously had the opportunities. It allows them to make a profit on their efforts and to leverage in a matter that creates sustainable social growth and value.

Great examples of Social Entrepreneurs in society include:

  • Muhammad Yunus
  • Marian Wright Edelman
  • Paul Wheelton
  • Dr Willie Smits
  • Jamie Oliver
  • Alan Khazei
  • Pamela Hartigan
  • Brent Freeman
  • Ela Bhatt

(Pictured Left to Right: Muhammad Yunus, Jamie Oliver, Marian Wright Edelman, Dr Willie Smits, Pamela Hartigan, Paul Wheelton)

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